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20121215
20121215
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
are not throwing america's seniors over the cliff to get a tax cut for the wealthiest people of america. we have clarity on that. host: sarah kliff? guest: the eligibility age quickly shaping up to be a big issue for the fiscal cliff. house republicans have said this is something they want to come out of these negotiations. congressional democrats, one of the top senators, has said we are not on board with it. it is difficult to see where that issue lands. what that will mean even chile is moving the age up to 67 -- will mean eventually is moving the age up to 67. host: the issue of spending, a large majority goes to these programs, medicare and medicaid, social security. speaker boehner was speaking about that yesterday. >> i am not concerned about my job. i am concerned about doing the right thing for our kids and grandkids. if we do not fix this spending problem, their future is going to be rather bleak. host: this doc fix will cost potentially $25 billion. where is the debate heading? guest: it is heading into the holiday season as there seems to be an impasse between the two political parti
's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. >> reporter: in washington, d.c., flags are flying at half staff as the country mourns with this small connecticut town that has lost so much. of course, thoughts and prayers of this entire community tonight are with those 26 victims that died here at the school. 20 young children under the age of 10 and also six adults. meanwhile, the investigation here continues. that's the story live in newtown, connecticut. chris pollone, nbc news, back to you. >> many thanks to chris. now to try to talk something sensible about this, we welcome blake zeft to the show, a former obama presidential campaign aide. we welcome back nan hayworth and mark simone. nan, let me begin with you, please. you're a doctor. >> yes. >> i know you're not a mental health doctor. but it has been alleged that he has asperger's syndrome, personality disorders -- nobody knows. does mental health play a huge role in this, from what you kno
. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings. kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. >> we're back. that was a very emotional president obama early this afternoon at the white house. nbc's christin welker is live from the latest in washington. christin, it's such an interesting and powerful moment in the presidency. being president is to be us. is to be our em blematic person and to react almost like the adult in the family the grown up, you know? >> absolutely. absolutely. and president obama today add miting that he was responding to this to this tragedy not only as the president, but also as a father who has two daughters. and that is how he watched these horrific events unfold. we certainly saw that raw emotion come out when he
happened yesterday. the actions of the teachers. how safe are in america's schools and america's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing to press for meaningful actions to prevent more incidents. our first call for the morning comes from new york on the line for independence. a teacher. good morning. caller: good morning. yes, i was a substitute teacher actually up an east strasbourg it. i can tell you that the respect and all of that that was a round what i was going to school is completely gone. i could not believe some of the things i got to see, and i was in middle school. these are still young the kids, 13 and 14 and 15 year olds. there is just no respect. i do not know whether it comes from the home or what. these kids are totally unmotivated in school. they have no respect for the teachers, no respect for authority. you
they're going to take their guns away. >> you know, america has a gun issue rate that almost twice the next highest country, number two is yemen. number three is switzerland. switzerland is declining. switzerland mandates that male citizens have that, from well-regulated militia days. yemen is not a place that american policymakers look to emulate in other contexts. i think there are people who say, no, it's not the nra, it's that americans like guns. it's a deep part of our culture. and you people who want to regulate guns, your problem isn't with this industry. your problem is with the american people. your problem is with democracy. your problem is with a population that from the very beginning has had this deep affection, strong connection, culturally to the guns. >> i think if you actually are able to explain to the american people, what am i asking for? anybody that buys a gun, you have to go through a background check. the majority of nra members actually believe that because they know there are honest citizens, most of them are hunters and sportsmen. >> right. right now, we
of our students are going in to teach for america. >> i'm going to ask one more question and then turn it over to the audience. my last question will be on immigration. you have spoken on the need for the dream act. can you talk about that? >> what first drew my attention was my first year of president a group of students came to see me, about 12 of them. they were all undocumented. they said we want you to support the dream act. they describe to me their lives. i was just stunned by their stories of growing up usually in the southwest or the west in families where they had no idea they were undocumented. then there came a moment with the needed documentation and they realize they were not citizens. suddenly they were thrust into this awareness of a whole nother world of not flying on planes to get back from vacation or not going home for vacation at all because they cannot travel are not being able to imagine medical school because they needed documentation to do that. i thought this is awful. do you come to this question as a human rights or as an economic development? both. here are
. and that was especially true today. i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers and men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the suffers as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early, and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country, we have been through this too many times. whether it's an elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon or a temple in wisconsin or a movie theater in aurora or a street coroner chicago, these neighborhoods
impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends here. good to see dan and rubber co and many others at the woodrow wilson center. there is no doubt the latino vote was important past election. we did not know how important this would be when we started t
in america. many people are struggling with issues related to mental health. by earning a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at capella.edu. challenge that with new olay facial hair removal duo. a two-step process that removes even coarse, stubborn facial hair gently. plenty of gain, without all that pain... with olay. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! without all that pain... it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and wildlife to photogr
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)